Tag Archives: Lecture

Professor Thomas Gallanis Lecture and Masterclass

The ILCR is pleased to welcome Professor Thomas Gallanis (Associate Dean for Research, Allan D. Vestal Chair in Law and Professor of History at the University of Iowa) as a senior visiting fellow. Professor Gallanis will give the following lecture and masterclass:

Lecture: Thurs, 20 April, 1-2pm, Old Class Library, Dept. of Medieval History, 69-71 South Street (lunch will now be available in Professor John Hudson’s office in the Department of Medieval History at 12.30)
“What Happened to English Constitutional History?”

Masterclass: Fri 21 April, 2-4pm, Old Seminar Room, Dept. of Medieval History, 69-71 South Street
“Bloody Code, Bloody Historians” Recommended advance reading is available here and here.

‘Law and Literature’ Lecture

The Annual ILCR ‘Law and Literature’ Lecture will take place on Monday 17 April, at 5.15pm in Parliament Hall.


‘Thomas Hobbes and the Norman Conquest’ Professor George Garnett, (University of Oxford) 


The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception.

Professor Garnett is a medievalist with interests ranging well into the early modern period. He has published a large study of the impact of the Norman Conquest on notions of kingship, succession, and tenure; a briefer introduction to the Conquest; and several essays on these and related themes. He also works on political thought in a more conventional sense: he has published an edition of Vindiciae, contra tyrannos, the highly influential sixteenth-century Huguenot resistance treatise, and a study of the role of providential history in the thought of the fourteenth-century Italian theorist and anti-papal publicist, Marsilius of Padua.

Annual Lecture

We regret to say that Lord Plant has had to withdraw from giving the ILCR Annual Lecture. However, we are pleased to say that, despite the short notice, Professor William Ian Miller has agreed to step in so that the event can go ahead. The time and place remain 5pm Thursday 27th April in Parliament Hall.

Professor Miller will be well known to many of you, and is highly regarded for his entertaining and extraordinarily wide-ranging lectures. The title of his lecture is:

‘Food (Sticky and Fast) and Ties that Bind’

Lorena Atzeri visit

The ILCR’s 2017 Candlemas semester events begin with a visit from Lorena Atzeri (Milan).

On Monday 30 January Dr Atzeri will deliver a lecture entitled ‘Infamy and Exclusion in Late Antiquity (Roman and Early Canon Law)’ (5.15, Old Class Library, Department of Medieval History).

On Tuesday 31 January Dr Atzeri will hold a workshop on ‘Religious dissidents and infamy in Late Antique legislation and Early Canon law’ (12.30pm for lunch in Rm 11, 71 South Street, workshop begins at 1pm in the Old Class Library).

The suggested primary reading for the workshop is a section of the Theodosian Code, available here and here (English trans).

The suggested secondary reading is: Banfi, Garnsey, and Humfress.

Annual Lecture: ‘’Boy meets Gift”

The Centre for Medieval and Early-Modern Law and Literature’s annual lecture, “Boy meets Gift: or, The Uses of Literature”, by Gadi Algazi and Steven D. White, takes place on Monday 18 April, 5.15pm, Parliament Hall.

Stephen D. White is Asa G. Candler Professor Emeritus of Medieval History at Emory University. His interests include the social, legal, and political history of medieval France and England, with a focus on the study of disputes and dispute-processing, violence, law and literature, and the interdisciplinary study of medieval European legal and political culture. He is the author of Custom, Kinship, and Gifts to Saints: the Laudatio Parentum in Western France, 1050-1150Sir Edward Coke and the Grievances of the Commonwealth, 1621-1628Feuding and Peacemaking in Eleventh-Century France; and Re-Thinking Kinship and Feudalism in Early Medieval Europe.

Gadi Algazi is professor of history at the Department of History, Tel Aviv University. His research interests include late medieval and early modern social and cultural history; historical anthropology; the history and theory of the social sciences; settler colonialism and frontier societies. He is currently completing a book on the shaping of scholars’ way of life and habitus between 1480 and 1630. Two recent publications from this project are “At the Study: Notes on the Production of the Scholarly Self,” in: Space and Self in Early Modern European Cultures, David Warren Sabean and Malina Stefanovska, eds. (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2012), and “Johannes Keplers Apologie: Wissensproduktion, Selbst­darstellung und die Geschlechterordnung,” in: Wissen, maßgeschneidert: Experten und Experten­kulturen im Europa der Vormoderne, Björn Reich, Frank Rexroth & Matthias Roick, eds. (Munich: Oldenbourg, 2012).