Tag Archives: Law

Emotions in Legal Practices

Registrations are now open to attend a 2-day international conference, Emotions in Legal Practices: Historical and Modern Attitudes Compared, at The University of Sydney 26-28 September 2016.

This interdisciplinary conference aims to stimulate genuine debate and encourage serious reflection on the enduring ‘problem’ of rationality and emotions. Our aim is for scholars and legal practitioners to bring their different disciplinary expertise to reconsider collectively the role of emotions in legal practices both historically and today and, potentially, inform new legal policies.

Further details are available on the Centre for Emotions website: http://www.historyofemotions.org.au/events/emotions-in-legal-practices-historical-and-modern-attitudes-compared/?date=2016-09-27

Registration is free but bookings are essential. Please register at http://alturl.com/zyfjq

Date: 26-28 September 2016 (commencing with a public lecture on the evening of 26 September by Prof. Annalise Acorn, Faculty of Law, University of Alberta, Canada). 

Venue: Holme Building Refectory, Science Rd, The University of Sydney, 2006

Symposium organisers: Merridee Bailey (The University of Adelaide) and Kimberley-Joy Knight (The University of Sydney)

Enquiries:  Jacquie Bennett (jacquie.bennett@adelaide.edu.au)

Registration: Registration is free, but essential as places are limited

 Confirmed keynote speakers:

•       Prof. Annalise Acorn, Faculty of Law, University of Alberta

•       Prof. Hila Keren, Southwestern Law School, Los Angeles, USA

•       Magistrate Hugh Dillon, Deputy State Coroner, NSW

•       Prof. Payam Akhavan (via Skype), McGill University, Montreal, Canada

ILCR Conference: 27-29 June (Report)

Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research hosted a conference entitled “Living with the Law: Society and Legal Disputes, c. 1200-1700.”

The conference, held from June 27-29, was organised by Dr Will Eves and PhD student Sarah White, and papers were given by research students, early career researchers, and established and senior scholars.

The two keynote lectures were given by Professor Paul Brand (“The Law and Social Mobility in Thirteenth-Century England: The Case of the Weyland Family”) and Professor Sir John Baker (“1616: ‘A Year Consecrate to Justice’”).

Panels covered “The Manipulation of Legal Process in High Medieval Europe” (Felicity Hill, Kenneth Duggan, and Cory Hitt, chaired by William Ian Miller), “Legal Interpretation and Theory” (Danica Summerlin, Joanna McCunn, and Lorenzo Moniscalco, chaired by Emanuele Conte), “Edinburgh Law School Session” (Hector MacQueen and John W. Cairns, chaired by Colin Kidd), “Law and Legal Practice in Early Modern Europe” (Kelsey Jackson-Williams, Julia Kelso, and Saskia Limbach, chaired by Magnus Ryan), “Lordship, Loyalty and the Law” (Matt McHaffie and Josh Hey, chaired by George Garnett).

On the final day of the conference, John Hudson, William Ian Miller, and Magnus Ryan led a roundtable discussion, with a closing summary by Caroline Humfress.

Papers covered the medieval and early modern periods, and concerned both the common law and ius commune. The mix of junior and senior researchers led to interesting discussions and established new connections between the various universities represented by the attendees.

The conference also included a chance to see the Marchmont MS of Regiam Majestatem recently acquired by St Andrews, as well a number of interesting legal-themed items from Special Collections in a thoughtful and well-curated display organised by Rachel Hart and Maia Sheridan.

Emotions in Legal Practices

Members of the ILCR may be interested in the Emotions in Legal Practices conference, more details of which can be found here:
 
 
In addition to hearing from invited speakers, the conference has issued a call for posters for a more novel session in which they ask for poster presentations of research accompanied by a 3-4 minute speed-bite presentation. The aim is to showcase national, international and interdisciplinary research in a dynamic format. In addition to the speed-bite presentations, there will be plenty of time for presenters to answer questions on their research. 
 
The conference will run 26-28 September in Sydney. It will be followed by a Postgraduate Advanced Training Seminar (PATS) on 29 September convened by David Lemmings (History, The University of Adelaide) and Kathryn Temple (English, Georgetown University). There are travel bursaries available to facilitate attendance at the conference and participation in the PATS. 

Annual Lecture: ‘’Boy meets Gift”

The Centre for Medieval and Early-Modern Law and Literature’s annual lecture, “Boy meets Gift: or, The Uses of Literature”, by Gadi Algazi and Steven D. White, takes place on Monday 18 April, 5.15pm, Parliament Hall.

Stephen D. White is Asa G. Candler Professor Emeritus of Medieval History at Emory University. His interests include the social, legal, and political history of medieval France and England, with a focus on the study of disputes and dispute-processing, violence, law and literature, and the interdisciplinary study of medieval European legal and political culture. He is the author of Custom, Kinship, and Gifts to Saints: the Laudatio Parentum in Western France, 1050-1150Sir Edward Coke and the Grievances of the Commonwealth, 1621-1628Feuding and Peacemaking in Eleventh-Century France; and Re-Thinking Kinship and Feudalism in Early Medieval Europe.

Gadi Algazi is professor of history at the Department of History, Tel Aviv University. His research interests include late medieval and early modern social and cultural history; historical anthropology; the history and theory of the social sciences; settler colonialism and frontier societies. He is currently completing a book on the shaping of scholars’ way of life and habitus between 1480 and 1630. Two recent publications from this project are “At the Study: Notes on the Production of the Scholarly Self,” in: Space and Self in Early Modern European Cultures, David Warren Sabean and Malina Stefanovska, eds. (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2012), and “Johannes Keplers Apologie: Wissensproduktion, Selbst­darstellung und die Geschlechterordnung,” in: Wissen, maßgeschneidert: Experten und Experten­kulturen im Europa der Vormoderne, Björn Reich, Frank Rexroth & Matthias Roick, eds. (Munich: Oldenbourg, 2012).

 

 

University of Cambridge: Maitland Studentship in Legal History

This studentship in Legal History, which can include Law and Literature, might be of interest to junior members of the Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research or to the students of members

The Managers of the F.W. Maitland Memorial Fund are able to offer one maintenance-only Studentship for Home/EU, or Overseas/Islands students applying to undertake doctoral research in legal history at the University of Cambridge, starting in October 2016. Studentships are tenable in the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of History, or the Faculty of English.

Applications will be accepted from students applying directly to read for the PhD degree only. Studentships are tenable for up to three years. Continued tenure of the Studentship will be subject to satisfactory academic progress, and to the meeting of any other conditions set by the University for continuation of study. In making decisions on the award or continuation of studentships, the Managers will take into account funding available from other sources.

The maximum annual value of the Studentship will be the University of Cambridge’s minimum maintenance requirement for PhD students, which for the academic year 2015-16 is £12750. Candidates wishing to be considered for this Studentship should complete the studentship application form and send it directly to Mrs Alison Hirst, University of Cambridge, Faculty of Law, 10 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DZ or by email to phdadmissions@law.cam.ac.uk by 30 January 2016. Candidates should also apply for admission as a graduate student by the relevant PhD course closing date in the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of History or the Faculty of English.