Tag Archives: Law & Literature

University of Cambridge: Maitland Studentship in Legal History

This studentship in Legal History, which can include Law and Literature, might be of interest to junior members of the Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research or to the students of members

The Managers of the F.W. Maitland Memorial Fund are able to offer one maintenance-only Studentship for Home/EU, or Overseas/Islands students applying to undertake doctoral research in legal history at the University of Cambridge, starting in October 2016. Studentships are tenable in the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of History, or the Faculty of English.

Applications will be accepted from students applying directly to read for the PhD degree only. Studentships are tenable for up to three years. Continued tenure of the Studentship will be subject to satisfactory academic progress, and to the meeting of any other conditions set by the University for continuation of study. In making decisions on the award or continuation of studentships, the Managers will take into account funding available from other sources.

The maximum annual value of the Studentship will be the University of Cambridge’s minimum maintenance requirement for PhD students, which for the academic year 2015-16 is £12750. Candidates wishing to be considered for this Studentship should complete the studentship application form and send it directly to Mrs Alison Hirst, University of Cambridge, Faculty of Law, 10 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DZ or by email to phdadmissions@law.cam.ac.uk by 30 January 2016. Candidates should also apply for admission as a graduate student by the relevant PhD course closing date in the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of History or the Faculty of English.

 

Reading Group: Interpreting Literature, Law, and Constitution (I)

Tuesday 6 October, 12:30-2 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History

The first CMEMLL Reading Group and the first meeting of the Institute of Legal And Constitutional Research will take place next Tuesday lunchtime (6th October). We’ll meet in the Old Seminar Room on the first floor of 71 South Street at 12.30pm for a sandwich lunch, with the Reading Group on ‘Interpreting Literature, Law, and Constitution (I)’ starting soon after 1pm and finishing in time for people to teach at 2pm.

The Reading Group will involve an introduction by John Hudson and Lorna Hutson followed by discussion on the theme of ‘Literature, Law and Constitution’.

The background reading is Chapter 1 of Christopher Warren, Literature and the Law of Nations, 1580-1680 (Oxford: OUP, 2015), available at:

http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198719342.001.0001/acprof-9780198719342-chapter-1

We look forward to seeing you there.

 

CMEMLL Conference: Emotions in the Courtroom

3 – 4 May, 2015
St John’s House, 71 South Street, St Andrews 

The recent surge of interest in the history of emotions has seen medievalists uncover a broad range of new source material recording the affective lives of Europeans in the Middle Ages. A parallel growth of interest in crime and judicial records from ecclesiastical and secular courts has identified these as excellent sources and made clear that the courtroom could be a locus for emotionally charged events. This one and a half day interdisciplinary symposium brings together scholars of law, literature and history to examine the role that emotions played in legal conduct and procedure.

The symposium is free of charge but pre-booking is required before 25th April, 2015. For pre-booking and information, contact: kimberley.knight@sydney.edu.au

The symposium has been generously supported by:

  • ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (Australia)
  • The Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Law and Literature, University of St Andrews
  • The Royal Society of Edinburgh
  • Power and Institutions in Medieval Islam and Christendom (PIMIC)

Convenors:

Kimberley-Joy Knight (CHE, The University of Sydney)

Jamie Page (University of Durham)

John Hudson (University of St Andrews)

Schedule:

Emotions in the Courtroom

CMEMLL Conference: The English Legal Imaginary, Part II

The English Legal Imaginary, 1500-1700, Parts I and II 

Part I: Princeton University, 17-18 April, 2015

Part II: University of St Andrews, 1-2 May, 2015

 The English Legal Imaginary Part I The English Legal Imaginary, Part II

CMEMLL is delighted to announce The English Legal Imaginary, Part II, taking place in the School of English on 1-2 May, 2015. The English Legal Imaginary, Part II is an interdisciplinary conference involving leading scholars working at the intersections of law, politics, literature and history in early modern England. The conference papers will contribute to the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of English Law and Literature, 1500-1700. Topics include: Roman law and common law, law and drama; law and education; equity, legal reform and literary censorship.

Speakers include: Martin Butler, Bradin Cormack, Alan Cromartie, Steve Hindle; Rab Houston, Lorna Hutson, David Ibbetson, James McBain, Subha Mukherji, Joad Raymond, Carolyn Sale, James Sharpe, Erica Sheen, Quentin Skinner, Virginia Lee Strain, Elliott Visconsi, Ian Williams, Jessica Winston, and Andrew Zurcher.

The registration fees for this conference are: £30 for students and unwaged, and £40 for waged participants. This fee covers lunch and coffee/tea breaks on both days, in addition to the conference dinner on Friday 1, and the closing wine and cheese reception on Saturday 2 May.

Conference Programme

Conference Programme 1 Conference Programme 2 Conference Programme 3

CMEMLL Annual Lecture 2015: Prof. Sir John Baker (University of Cambridge)

‘Magna Carta – Statute or Myth?’

Thursday 2 April, 2015, 5.15 pm
School III, St Salvator’s Quadrangle

Sir John Baker, Downing Professor Emeritus of the Laws of England at St Catharine’s College, University of Cambridge, will give a paper entitled ‘Magna Carta – Statute or Myth?’.

2014-15 - John Baker

Abstract
Magna Carta has had an immense influence on hearts and minds, and even events, over the last eight hundred years. Yet it is not always understood that this has been achieved more by magic than by operation of positive law. Much of the text was obsolete or obsolescent five hundred years ago, and what remained was difficult even for the lawyers of those days to interpret. In any case, no remedies were provided for private subjects in case the words were not observed by the king. The lecture will address some of these legal difficulties and outline how and when they were overcome.

 


Professor Sir Baker’s research interests include English legal history, especially in the early-modern period; history of the legal profession and the Inns of Court; and manuscript law reports and readings.  Alongside his academic career, he is a Barrister at both the Inner Temple and Gray’s Inn, and an Honorary Bencher at the Inner Temple.

His substantial list of publications most notably includes the Oxford History of the Laws of England, Volume VI: 1483-1558 (2003) and the frequently reprinted Introduction to English Legal History (1st ed. 1971, 2nd ed. 1979, 3rd ed. 1990, and 4th ed. 2002).  However, he has also published extensively on the Inns of Court, including Readings and Moots at the Inns of Court in the Fifteenth Century (2000) and most recently The Men of Court 1440 to 1550: A Prosopography of the Inns of Court and Chancery and the Courts of Law (2012).  He has further edited numerous collections of manuscripts and reports, including The Reports of Sir John Spelman  (1977), The Reports of William Dalison, 1552-1558 (2007), and Reports from the Time of Henry VIII (2003–04).

The lecture will be followed by a wine reception in the Lawson Lecture Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English.

All welcome.