Tag Archives: John Hudson

Professor John Hudson Receives Teaching Award

ILCR Director Professor John Hudson has received the 2017 St Andrews Students’ Association Teaching Award in the ‘Excellence as a Dissertation/Project Supervisor’ category. Professor Hudson currently supervises several ILCR PhD students and has guided many PhD projects and Mlitt dissertations to completion during his time at St Andrews. He was nominated for this award by a number of current and former students.

More details of the 2017 Teaching Excellence Awards are available here.

Professor Hudson (middle, far left) receives 2017 Teaching Award from University Principal Professor Sally Mapstone (front).

Professors John Hudson and Lorna Hutson elected Fellows of the British Academy

Professor John Hudson of the School of History and Professor Lorna Hutson of the School of English have been elected Fellows of the British Academy.

Professors Hudson and Hutson are among 42 new Fellows named by the Academy, in recognition of their world-leading research into the humanities and social sciences, including law, linguistics, economics and history. Together, Professors Hudson and Hutson have co-directed The Centre for Mediaeval and Early Modern Law and Literature at the University of St Andrews for the past five years.

The British Academy is the premier national body representing the humanities and the social sciences, the counterpart of the Royal Society for the natural sciences.

An expert in both mediaeval studies and legal history, Professor John Hudson’s work focuses on 9th to 13th-century England. His research also spans mediaeval historical writing and late 19th-century study of mediaeval England. At the University of St Andrews, he is founding Director of the Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research, and he has a visiting position as William W. Cook Global Law Professor at the University of Michigan.

Professor Hudson is already a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. He has given invited research lectures around the world, is general editor of the series Medieval Law and its Practice (Brill), and is currently on the editorial board for The Mediaeval Journal.

Upon receiving his Fellowship of the British Academy, Professor Hudson said “I am delighted and honoured to be elected to the British Academy. I am particularly pleased to be elected in the fields both of Mediaeval Studies and of Law.  The University of St Andrews has a long-held reputation as one of the top centres in the world for the study of Mediaeval History and is now establishing one in that of law through the Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research.

“I owe more than can be said to my colleagues in St Andrews over the years, taking particular pleasure in collaborative work with postgraduate and post-doctoral scholars here in recent times, and with established colleagues in Europe and North America. I hope that my Fellowship of the British Academy will allow me to extend such collaborative work in the future.”

Professor Lorna Hutson is Berry Professor of English Literature at the University of St Andrews and she will take up the post of Merton Professor of English Literature at Oxford on 1 September 2016. Her interests are in the rhetorical bases of Renaissance Literature, emphasizing fiction’s affinities with forensic rhetoric.

Her 2007 book, The Invention of Suspicion, won the Roland Bainton Prize for Literature and her most recent book, Circumstantial Shakespeare (2015) is based on the Oxford Wells Shakespeare Lectures delivered in 2012. She has been a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellow and held Fellowships at the Folger and the Huntington Libraries, and been Alice Griffin Shakespeare Fellow at Auckland, New Zealand. Her Oxford Handbook of English Law and Literature 1500-1700 is forthcoming. She currently holds a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship for research on 16th-century Anglo-Scots literary relations. In 2016 she delivered the British Academy Shakespeare Lecture, The Shakespearean Unscene.

Professor Lorna Hutson commented, “I am honoured and delighted to be elected to the British Academy and especially to have been elected while still in post at the University of St Andrews, before I take up my new post at Oxford in September.

“St Andrews has an exceptionally vibrant Faculty of Arts, within which English Literature is outstanding.

“Literary criticism has the advantage of bringing a fine-grained precision to the broader work of cultural and historical analysis. I’ve been privileged, at St Andrews, to have the chance of working with historians and legal historians who appreciate the insights literature affords.

“I hope that I will be able, as a Fellow of the British Academy, to work for the furthering of such interdisciplinary conversations and for the advancement of the Humanities in general.”

Read more here and here.

“DIVERGING PATHS? The Shapes of Power and Institutions in Medieval Christendom and Islam” RECEIVES STELLAR REVIEW

Diverging Paths? The Shapes of Power and Institutions in Medieval Christendom and Islam” (Brill, 2014), received a stellar review to be included in the “The Medieval Review”.

The book is edited by John Hudson, Director of the Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research (ILCR), and long-time friend of St Andrews Ana Rodríguez (CCHS-CSIC). It emerges from work undertaken in the related projects “Diverging Paths” and “Power and Institutions in Medieval Islam and Christendom“, and includes contributions from John Hudson, and Caroline Humfress.

From the forthcoming review by Thomas W. Barton (University of San Diego):

This sophisticated volume illustrates the impressive, thought-provoking results an accomplished, diverse group of scholars can produce in pursuit of a simple and open-ended yet ultimately difficult and complicated question. Based on the level and manner of institutionalization of Islamic and Christian societies in the early medieval period, one would have expected their respective development by the late Middle Ages to be the reverse from what,Diverging Paths in fact, transpired. For example, whereas Christendom witnessed the development of sophisticated medieval states and other exclusive economic and political organizations, Islamic societies were seemingly prevented by the nature of Islamic law from developing similarly elitist institutions. How can scholars account for this unexpected reversal in “institutionalisation and institutional continuity” (xi)? Funded by Spain’s Ministry of Science and Technology, a gathering of handpicked experts on premodern Islamic and Christian societies from around the world (but predominately Europe) participated in a number of meetings convoked by Ana Rodríguez and Eduardo Manzano at their Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) in Madrid between 2009 and 2013. The project took the same name now borne by this handsome volume and pursued a fascinating and timely inquiry into the comparative institutional development of societies of the premodern Mediterranean, a topic that has of course interested historians for generations. Yet with a plethora of highly trained and interested experts and arguably more collaboration between scholars working on the formerly much too isolated Islamic and Christian sides of the Mediterranean world (encouraged by numerous and proliferating networking associations), academia has never been better prepared to tackle such a project.

It is uncommon to find an edited volume for which the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Nevertheless, such is the case with Diverging Paths?, which manifests an impressive degree of synergy among its widely varied contributions. Nearly every essay could stand alone as a significant contribution to its respective field, yet the individual arguments become all the more intriguing and meaningful when presented within the broader context and comparative framework generated by the volume. This cumulative effect must be at least partly the result of sustained collaboration by these scholars over several years, enabling them to tweak their theoretical approaches and assumptions and ruminate adequately over the meanings of their results. It is also clearly owing to the hard work of the editors, who were evidently committed to expending the additional thought and work to generate the introductory and concluding materials necessary to tie these diverse studies together into a more meaningful aggregate for their readership. In sum, this well-presented volume offers its readers an array of perspectives on a subset of the comparative historical issues that are intriguing premodern scholars in a mode that will be challenging yet still accessible to non-specialists, while both highly engaging and valuable for experts.

When published, a full version of the review will be available here.

*This post has been very slightly adapted for the ILCR from a post written by Lydia Hayes for the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies (SAIMS) blog.

 

Reading Group: Interpreting Literature, Law, and Constitution (I)

Tuesday 6 October, 12:30-2 pm
Old Seminar Room, 71 South Street, School of History

The first CMEMLL Reading Group and the first meeting of the Institute of Legal And Constitutional Research will take place next Tuesday lunchtime (6th October). We’ll meet in the Old Seminar Room on the first floor of 71 South Street at 12.30pm for a sandwich lunch, with the Reading Group on ‘Interpreting Literature, Law, and Constitution (I)’ starting soon after 1pm and finishing in time for people to teach at 2pm.

The Reading Group will involve an introduction by John Hudson and Lorna Hutson followed by discussion on the theme of ‘Literature, Law and Constitution’.

The background reading is Chapter 1 of Christopher Warren, Literature and the Law of Nations, 1580-1680 (Oxford: OUP, 2015), available at:

http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198719342.001.0001/acprof-9780198719342-chapter-1

We look forward to seeing you there.