Tag Archives: Conference

Emotions in Legal Practices

Registrations are now open to attend a 2-day international conference, Emotions in Legal Practices: Historical and Modern Attitudes Compared, at The University of Sydney 26-28 September 2016.

This interdisciplinary conference aims to stimulate genuine debate and encourage serious reflection on the enduring ‘problem’ of rationality and emotions. Our aim is for scholars and legal practitioners to bring their different disciplinary expertise to reconsider collectively the role of emotions in legal practices both historically and today and, potentially, inform new legal policies.

Further details are available on the Centre for Emotions website: http://www.historyofemotions.org.au/events/emotions-in-legal-practices-historical-and-modern-attitudes-compared/?date=2016-09-27

Registration is free but bookings are essential. Please register at http://alturl.com/zyfjq

Date: 26-28 September 2016 (commencing with a public lecture on the evening of 26 September by Prof. Annalise Acorn, Faculty of Law, University of Alberta, Canada). 

Venue: Holme Building Refectory, Science Rd, The University of Sydney, 2006

Symposium organisers: Merridee Bailey (The University of Adelaide) and Kimberley-Joy Knight (The University of Sydney)

Enquiries:  Jacquie Bennett (jacquie.bennett@adelaide.edu.au)

Registration: Registration is free, but essential as places are limited

 Confirmed keynote speakers:

•       Prof. Annalise Acorn, Faculty of Law, University of Alberta

•       Prof. Hila Keren, Southwestern Law School, Los Angeles, USA

•       Magistrate Hugh Dillon, Deputy State Coroner, NSW

•       Prof. Payam Akhavan (via Skype), McGill University, Montreal, Canada

ILCR Conference: 27-29 June (Report)

Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research hosted a conference entitled “Living with the Law: Society and Legal Disputes, c. 1200-1700.”

The conference, held from June 27-29, was organised by Dr Will Eves and PhD student Sarah White, and papers were given by research students, early career researchers, and established and senior scholars.

The two keynote lectures were given by Professor Paul Brand (“The Law and Social Mobility in Thirteenth-Century England: The Case of the Weyland Family”) and Professor Sir John Baker (“1616: ‘A Year Consecrate to Justice’”).

Panels covered “The Manipulation of Legal Process in High Medieval Europe” (Felicity Hill, Kenneth Duggan, and Cory Hitt, chaired by William Ian Miller), “Legal Interpretation and Theory” (Danica Summerlin, Joanna McCunn, and Lorenzo Moniscalco, chaired by Emanuele Conte), “Edinburgh Law School Session” (Hector MacQueen and John W. Cairns, chaired by Colin Kidd), “Law and Legal Practice in Early Modern Europe” (Kelsey Jackson-Williams, Julia Kelso, and Saskia Limbach, chaired by Magnus Ryan), “Lordship, Loyalty and the Law” (Matt McHaffie and Josh Hey, chaired by George Garnett).

On the final day of the conference, John Hudson, William Ian Miller, and Magnus Ryan led a roundtable discussion, with a closing summary by Caroline Humfress.

Papers covered the medieval and early modern periods, and concerned both the common law and ius commune. The mix of junior and senior researchers led to interesting discussions and established new connections between the various universities represented by the attendees.

The conference also included a chance to see the Marchmont MS of Regiam Majestatem recently acquired by St Andrews, as well a number of interesting legal-themed items from Special Collections in a thoughtful and well-curated display organised by Rachel Hart and Maia Sheridan.