Tag Archives: Common Law

Research Fellowships in Legal History

Advertisements have now appeared on jobs.ac.uk for four Research Fellowships in Legal History to work with Professor John Hudson on the ERC Advance Grant funded project ‘Civil Law, Common Law, Customary Law: Consonance, Divergence and Transformation in Western Europe from the late eleventh to the thirteenth centuries’. Three are medieval, concerning England, France, and Italy, whilst the fourth is concerned with the eighteenth to twentieth centuries.

Research Fellow in Mediaeval Legal History (Italy) – AR1945SB: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BBD126/research-fellow-in-mediaeval-legal-history-italy-ar1945sb/

Research Fellowship in Legal History – AR1943AC: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BBD054/research-fellowship-in-legal-history/

Research Fellow in Mediaeval Legal History (England) – AR1944AC: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BBD178/research-fellow-in-mediaeval-legal-history-england-ar1944ac/

Research Fellow in Mediaeval Legal History (France) – AR1946SB: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BBD219/research-fellow-in-mediaeval-legal-history-france-ar1946sb/

Professor John Hudson awarded European Research Council ‘Advanced Grant’

John Hudson has been awarded a European Research Council ‘Advanced Grant’ of over two million Euros for a project entitled ‘Civil Law, Common Law, Customary Law: Consonance, Divergence and Transformation in Western Europe from the late eleventh to the thirteenth centuries’. The project will employ four post-doctoral fellows and two PhD students.

Professor Hudson outlines the project as follows: ‘A highly significant division in present-day Europe is between two types of legal system: the Continental with foundations in Civil Law (law with an ultimately Roman law basis), and English Common Law. Both trace their continuous history back to the twelfth century. The present project re-evaluates this vital period in legal history, by comparing not just English Common Law and Continental Civil Law (or “Ius commune”), but also the customary laws crucially important in Continental Europe even beyond the twelfth century. Such laws shared many features with English law, and the comparison thus disrupts the simplistic English:Continental distinction. The project first analyses the form, functioning and development of local, national, and supra-national laws. Similarities, differences, and influences will then be examined from perspectives of longer-term European legal development. Proper historical re-examination of the subject is very timely because of current invocation of supposed legal histories, be it Eurosceptic celebration of English Common Law or rhetorical use of Ius commune as precedent for a common European Law.’

ILCR Conference: 27-29 June (Report)

Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research hosted a conference entitled “Living with the Law: Society and Legal Disputes, c. 1200-1700.”

The conference, held from June 27-29, was organised by Dr Will Eves and PhD student Sarah White, and papers were given by research students, early career researchers, and established and senior scholars.

The two keynote lectures were given by Professor Paul Brand (“The Law and Social Mobility in Thirteenth-Century England: The Case of the Weyland Family”) and Professor Sir John Baker (“1616: ‘A Year Consecrate to Justice’”).

Panels covered “The Manipulation of Legal Process in High Medieval Europe” (Felicity Hill, Kenneth Duggan, and Cory Hitt, chaired by William Ian Miller), “Legal Interpretation and Theory” (Danica Summerlin, Joanna McCunn, and Lorenzo Moniscalco, chaired by Emanuele Conte), “Edinburgh Law School Session” (Hector MacQueen and John W. Cairns, chaired by Colin Kidd), “Law and Legal Practice in Early Modern Europe” (Kelsey Jackson-Williams, Julia Kelso, and Saskia Limbach, chaired by Magnus Ryan), “Lordship, Loyalty and the Law” (Matt McHaffie and Josh Hey, chaired by George Garnett).

On the final day of the conference, John Hudson, William Ian Miller, and Magnus Ryan led a roundtable discussion, with a closing summary by Caroline Humfress.

Papers covered the medieval and early modern periods, and concerned both the common law and ius commune. The mix of junior and senior researchers led to interesting discussions and established new connections between the various universities represented by the attendees.

The conference also included a chance to see the Marchmont MS of Regiam Majestatem recently acquired by St Andrews, as well a number of interesting legal-themed items from Special Collections in a thoughtful and well-curated display organised by Rachel Hart and Maia Sheridan.