Category Archives: CMEMLL

Professors John Hudson and Lorna Hutson elected Fellows of the British Academy

Professor John Hudson of the School of History and Professor Lorna Hutson of the School of English have been elected Fellows of the British Academy.

Professors Hudson and Hutson are among 42 new Fellows named by the Academy, in recognition of their world-leading research into the humanities and social sciences, including law, linguistics, economics and history. Together, Professors Hudson and Hutson have co-directed The Centre for Mediaeval and Early Modern Law and Literature at the University of St Andrews for the past five years.

The British Academy is the premier national body representing the humanities and the social sciences, the counterpart of the Royal Society for the natural sciences.

An expert in both mediaeval studies and legal history, Professor John Hudson’s work focuses on 9th to 13th-century England. His research also spans mediaeval historical writing and late 19th-century study of mediaeval England. At the University of St Andrews, he is founding Director of the Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research, and he has a visiting position as William W. Cook Global Law Professor at the University of Michigan.

Professor Hudson is already a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. He has given invited research lectures around the world, is general editor of the series Medieval Law and its Practice (Brill), and is currently on the editorial board for The Mediaeval Journal.

Upon receiving his Fellowship of the British Academy, Professor Hudson said “I am delighted and honoured to be elected to the British Academy. I am particularly pleased to be elected in the fields both of Mediaeval Studies and of Law.  The University of St Andrews has a long-held reputation as one of the top centres in the world for the study of Mediaeval History and is now establishing one in that of law through the Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research.

“I owe more than can be said to my colleagues in St Andrews over the years, taking particular pleasure in collaborative work with postgraduate and post-doctoral scholars here in recent times, and with established colleagues in Europe and North America. I hope that my Fellowship of the British Academy will allow me to extend such collaborative work in the future.”

Professor Lorna Hutson is Berry Professor of English Literature at the University of St Andrews and she will take up the post of Merton Professor of English Literature at Oxford on 1 September 2016. Her interests are in the rhetorical bases of Renaissance Literature, emphasizing fiction’s affinities with forensic rhetoric.

Her 2007 book, The Invention of Suspicion, won the Roland Bainton Prize for Literature and her most recent book, Circumstantial Shakespeare (2015) is based on the Oxford Wells Shakespeare Lectures delivered in 2012. She has been a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellow and held Fellowships at the Folger and the Huntington Libraries, and been Alice Griffin Shakespeare Fellow at Auckland, New Zealand. Her Oxford Handbook of English Law and Literature 1500-1700 is forthcoming. She currently holds a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship for research on 16th-century Anglo-Scots literary relations. In 2016 she delivered the British Academy Shakespeare Lecture, The Shakespearean Unscene.

Professor Lorna Hutson commented, “I am honoured and delighted to be elected to the British Academy and especially to have been elected while still in post at the University of St Andrews, before I take up my new post at Oxford in September.

“St Andrews has an exceptionally vibrant Faculty of Arts, within which English Literature is outstanding.

“Literary criticism has the advantage of bringing a fine-grained precision to the broader work of cultural and historical analysis. I’ve been privileged, at St Andrews, to have the chance of working with historians and legal historians who appreciate the insights literature affords.

“I hope that I will be able, as a Fellow of the British Academy, to work for the furthering of such interdisciplinary conversations and for the advancement of the Humanities in general.”

Read more here and here.

CMEMLL

The Centre for Mediaeval and Early Modern Law and Literature has enjoyed five very successful years at St Andrews, with reading groups, conferences, workshops, and lectures. Under the joint leadership of Lorna Hutson (English) and John Hudson (History) it has been a place for very fertile inter-disciplinary discussion and development. We look forward to continuing this inter-disciplinary discussion once Lorna has taken up the Merton Chair of English Literature at Oxford in the summer of 2016.

From the end of the academic year 2015-16, the St Andrews Centre will become a collaborative forum between St Andrews, Oxford, and Cambridge, with Law and Literature events continuing at St Andrews under the auspices of the Institute for Legal and Constitutional Research.

Annual Lecture: ‘’Boy meets Gift”

The Centre for Medieval and Early-Modern Law and Literature’s annual lecture, “Boy meets Gift: or, The Uses of Literature”, by Gadi Algazi and Steven D. White, takes place on Monday 18 April, 5.15pm, Parliament Hall.

Stephen D. White is Asa G. Candler Professor Emeritus of Medieval History at Emory University. His interests include the social, legal, and political history of medieval France and England, with a focus on the study of disputes and dispute-processing, violence, law and literature, and the interdisciplinary study of medieval European legal and political culture. He is the author of Custom, Kinship, and Gifts to Saints: the Laudatio Parentum in Western France, 1050-1150Sir Edward Coke and the Grievances of the Commonwealth, 1621-1628Feuding and Peacemaking in Eleventh-Century France; and Re-Thinking Kinship and Feudalism in Early Medieval Europe.

Gadi Algazi is professor of history at the Department of History, Tel Aviv University. His research interests include late medieval and early modern social and cultural history; historical anthropology; the history and theory of the social sciences; settler colonialism and frontier societies. He is currently completing a book on the shaping of scholars’ way of life and habitus between 1480 and 1630. Two recent publications from this project are “At the Study: Notes on the Production of the Scholarly Self,” in: Space and Self in Early Modern European Cultures, David Warren Sabean and Malina Stefanovska, eds. (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2012), and “Johannes Keplers Apologie: Wissensproduktion, Selbst­darstellung und die Geschlechterordnung,” in: Wissen, maßgeschneidert: Experten und Experten­kulturen im Europa der Vormoderne, Björn Reich, Frank Rexroth & Matthias Roick, eds. (Munich: Oldenbourg, 2012).

 

 

Professor Todd Butler Visit (28-29 March)

Professor Todd Butler (Washington State) will be visiting the Institute’s Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Law and Literature (CMEMLL) from 28-29 March.

On Monday 28 March at 4pm in the Lawson Lecture Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English, Todd will lead a masterclass on the following materials (available for download here):

Anon – A True Report of the Araignment, Tryall, Conviction, and Demnation of a Popish Priest (1607).

Todd Butler, ‘Equivocation, Cognition, and Political Authority in Early Modern England’ (2012).

This masterclass is intended mainly for the benefit of postgraduate and early career researchers, but all interested parties are welcome. After the session, we will be joining Todd for dinner at Zizzi’s. All parties who wish to attend should RSVP to Toria Johnson (taj3@st-andrews.ac.uk) and attend at their own expense.

On Tuesday 29 March at 5.15pm, again in the Lawson Lecture Room, Kennedy Hall, School of English, Todd will give a lecture entitled ‘Milton, Deliberative Liberty, and the Law of Spousal Privileges’. The abstract for this talk is as follows:

Placing John Milton’s divorce tracts within the broader context of both seventeenth-century marriage manuals and modern rules regarding spousal testimony at law, this paper argues that Milton’s particular interest in maintaining the privacy of marital conversation illumines not only the course of legal and familial history but also the fundamental—and potentially flawed—assumptions of contemporary political liberalism. While the arguments of Milton and other seventeenth-century advice writers helped spur courts to exclude spousal testimony on the basis of marital harmony rather than just masculine headship, an examination of modern legal scholarship on spousal privileges also reveals a fundamental tension in Milton’s tracts regarding the expression of self-interest, one that demonstrates the difficulty both Milton and modern theorists such as Jürgen Habermas have in accommodating distinctions of gender within not only early modern marriage but also constructions of the modern liberal subject.